Please note:
MPI's 2020 Annual Peacebuilding Training was canceled because of COVID-19. We are maintaining the list of the courses and facilitators listed below for your information, but they are subject to change for the next training.

For MPI 2020, the Annual Peacebuilding Training will consist of 13 courses classified into three categories: Foundation, Thematic, and Field-Based. These courses will be taught by a distinguished roster of facilitators from Asia-Pacific, Africa, and North America. Four Foundation Courses will be concurrently offered in Week 1, five Thematic Courses in Week 2, and two Thematic Courses and two Field-Based Courses will be offered in Week 3. Participants may opt to enroll for just one week, two weeks or all three weeks.

MPI 2020 ANNUAL PEACEBUILDING TRAINING

MPI 2020: A Vision of Peace

Eye with MPI Logo in center

FOUNDATION COURSES

THEMATIC COURSES

FIELD-BASED COURSES

The Foundation Courses lay out the fundamental parameters, approaches and processes encompassed in the field of peacebuilding.

The Thematic Courses build on the foundation courses by delving into particular strategic areas and focused applications.

The Field-Based Courses provide learning opportunities by engaging real world communities where peacebuilding practices are being implemented, challenged and refined.

WEEK 1: 2020 | FOUNDATION COURSES

From Understanding to Action: Designing Conflict Sensitive Interventions (FUA)

Phyusin Ngwethaw (Myanmar) and Joan McGregor (South Africa/United Kingdom)

From Understanding to Action: Designing Conflict Sensitive Interventions (FUA)
Phyusin Ngwethaw (Myanmar) and Joan McGregor (South Africa/United Kingdom) 

This course is designed for aid, development and peace practitioners working in situations affected by conflict and violence. It explores the importance of designing interventions based on careful analysis of the context, considering the relationship between the conflict context and the intended intervention. The course provides an overview of current frameworks and approaches of context conflict analysis at different community and societal levels. It explores the range of interventions that are needed to work towards sustainable peace. By the end of the course, participants will be able to apply practical tools for conflict analysis as a critical step in designing appropriate conflict sensitive initiatives.

Broadly, conflict context analysis helps participants identify different types of conflict, the causes of conflicts, the actors directly and indirectly involved, the progression and dynamics of the conflict, opportunities for resolution and possible outcomes. The course will concretely link the steps from analysis to relevant action towards effective change to transform the conflict and work towards sustainable peace, taking into account the concept of Do No Harm through conflict sensitive approaches.

Fundamentals of Peacebuilding

Paulo Baleinakorodawa (Fiji) and Gabrielle Aziza Sagaral (Philippines)

Fundamentals of Peacebuilding (FPB)
Paulo Baleinakorodawa (Fiji) and Gabrielle Aziza Sagaral (Philippines)

This course introduces participants to the broad field of peacebuilding. It provides a comprehensive overview of peacebuilding and its multi-disciplinary and multi-level aspects. It focuses on how peacebuilding can bring about transformation in interpersonal, communal and societal violent conflicts through theory, analysis and practice. Participants explore the challenges and dilemmas of peacebuilding in contemporary, protracted and violent conflict. By the end of this course, participants will understand how to develop a strategic framework for peacebuilding, primarily from the perspective of non-governmental practitioners. Through interactions with current theories, analyses and practices, participants will develop analytic and peacebuilding skills by way of exercises, simulations, and case studies. Participants are expected to work in teams on a collaborative application of the framework.

Introduction to Conflict Transformation (ICT)

Wendy Kroeker (Canada) and Michael Frank A. Alar (Philippines)

Introduction to Conflict Transformation (ICT)
Wendy Kroeker (Canada) and Michael Frank A. Alar (Philippines)

This course presents an introduction to the field of conflict transformation with a focus on the theoretical understandings of conflict and conflict transformation as well as the development and application of frameworks for this field. By the end of the course, participants will have a greater understanding of the role of conflict in peacebuilding, recognize the challenges and practices of intervening in conflict dynamics, and have enhanced skills in applying conflict transformation to the analysis of conflict. Opportunity is given to reflect on strategies for one’s home and work context. The course is experiential in nature, allowing for conflict resolution skill practice and enhancement of conflict transformation understandings through discussion and group work. Teaching methodologies encompass large and small group discussions, role plays, interactive exercises, and case analyses.

Peace Education as a Peacebuilding Process (PEP)

A-Young Moon (Korea) and Melinda Lamorena (Philippines)

Peace Education as a Peacebuilding Process (PEP)
A-Young Moon (Korea) and Melinda Medina Lamorena (Philippines)

Learning is a transformational process. In this sense, peace education is a process of transforming people to become peacebuilders. This course provides space for critical and transformative learning on peace education. It also intends to support participants who wish to be involved in peacebuilding advocacies or those who desire to hone their peace education practices in their respective fields. By the end of this course, participants will be able to articulate theories, practices and approaches of peace education at different levels and diverse perspectives; critically analyze pedagogies and methodologies of peace education as a peacebuilding process; and design a customized peace education program for their own context.

WEEK 2: 2020 | THEMATIC COURSES

Conflict Resolution Skills: Mediation and Dialogue (CRS)

Paulo Baleinakorodawa (Fiji) and Wendy Kroeker (Canada)

Conflict Resolution Skills: Mediation and Dialogue (CRS)
Paulo Baleinakorodawa (Fiji) and Wendy Kroeker (Canada)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Conflict Transformation or Fundamentals of Peacebuilding or an equivalent course or experience

This course explores the theory and practice of different conflict resolution methods with an emphasis on mediation and dialogue. Sessions on mediation focus on the conceptual framework, process and practice of mediation in both interpersonal and group contexts. Discussions on dialogue explore frameworks, tools and applications for interpersonal and group/community conflicts. By the end of this course, participants will have acquired facilitation and relationship-building techniques and skills that can be utilized in inter-group conflicts as a method of nonviolent conflict resolution and transformation. Teaching methodologies encompass large and small group discussions, role plays, interactive exercises, and case analyses.

Cultivating Environmental Peace (CEP)

Bertram Jenkins (Australia) and Carino V. Antequisa (Philippines)

Cultivating Environmental Peace (CEP)
Bertram A. Jenkins (Australia) and Carino V. Antequisa (Philippines)

Environmental Peacebuilding at its core is the concept "caring for country," meaning looking after nature, our habitat and the habitat of other species with whom we share this planet. There are often conflicts over the extraction of natural resources (mining, logging, fishing, harvesting), water and land rights, pollution of land, water, and air. To be responsible stewards, we must make every effort to look after our planet and biosphere for all human inhabitants, other species, and future generations.

As part of the course, the participants will discuss the "resource curse" that many countries face in their bid to raise revenue through extracting and selling natural resources. The importance of indigenous rights, culture and knowledge, and climate change, which are often ignored in planning projects that impact on the environment, will also be considered. In examining links between peacebuilding and the environment, the participants will learn about three dimensions of environmental peacebuilding; protection and conservation of nature, restoration of damage done to ecosystems, and managing nature for sustainable outcomes. Learning will be through discussion and group work involving interaction in large and small groups, role plays, active learning exercises, and analyses of case studies.

By the end of the course, participants will appreciate how caring for the environment and genuine sustainable practices go hand in hand with cultivating peace; understand how environmental crises contribute to conflict and how peacebuilding can reduce, minimize and prevent ecological violence; have the capacity to analyze conflict using approaches and tools to address threats to the environment and promote caring for the environment at the grass roots level.

Dealing with Trauma in Times of Conflict (DTTC)

Gladston Xavier (India) and Florina Xavier (India)

Dealing with Trauma in Times of Conflict (DTTC)
Gladston Xavier (India) and Florina Xavier (India)

Conflicts or disasters at any level or of any type can trigger a traumatic reaction among individuals, groups, communities and societies. The series of reactions produced depend upon the type of trauma experienced. Oftentimes, people who are traumatized cannot escape the environment that caused it. In addition, they may not even be aware that they have been traumatized and carry on without understanding the signs and symptoms. They are unable to seek help due to a lack of awareness and/or access to therapeutic intervention.

This course explores and discusses the basic understanding of trauma, including practical ways to overcome it during and after conflict. The course adopts an “elicitive” learning process and follows a workshop format using experiential role plays and case studies combined with short lectures. By the end of this interactive course, participants will: a) be able to recognize the causes of and reactions to trauma from multiple perspectives; b) have an understanding of the specific dynamic causes and effects of trauma in relation to conflict; and c) have tools and techniques to deal with trauma which can assist in the process of healing. 

Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation for Peacebuilding Practitioners (MEPP)

Myla Leguro (Philippines) and Shiva Dhungana (Nepal)

Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation for Peacebuilding Practitioners (MEPP)
Myla Leguro (Philippines) and Shiva K. Dhungana (Nepal)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Conflict Transformation or Fundamentals of Peacebuilding or an equivalent course or experience

This course approaches monitoring and evaluation from a learning perspective and introduces theories of change, indicators, monitoring, evaluation design, and tools for reflective practice. By the end of this course, participants will be able to practice evaluative thinking; design better projects; monitor and learn from those projects more regularly and effectively; engage with evaluation more thoroughly; and improve practice and accountability of all concerned parties.

The emphasis of the course is on utilization-focused evaluation and working with qualitative data through mini-lectures, experiential learning exercises, and practical case applications. It is for peacebuilding practitioners and professionals. Participants should already be familiar with the theory and practice of peacebuilding, but new to the field of monitoring and evaluation.

Understanding Culture and Identity as a Resource for Peacebuilding (UCIRP)

Joan McGregor (South Africa/United Kingdom) and Moe Sasaki (Japan)

Understanding Culture and Identity as a Resource for Peacebuilding (UCIRP)
Joan McGregor (South Africa/United Kingdom) and Moe Sasaki (Japan)

This course explores the overarching questions about identity and culture – religion, political affiliation, family dynasties, clan relationships, nationality, gender and the marginalized. This course is designed to focus on issues related to prejudice, exclusion and marginalization. It deepens understanding of some of the key elements that shape identity and examines how identity can change. It also examines concepts of culture, and explores the interplay between culture and identity. Participants will be expected to be willing to explore their own identity and culture as part of the learning journey.

Questions asked during the course will include: What forms identity? What forms culture? How and when does power come into play? How do communities protect their identity without falling into a mindset that is prejudiced and that can lead to exclusion and conflict? How does one’s identity affect one’s role in civil society? How can we, as peacebuilders, become multi-cultural?

Throughout the week, the knowledge and experience of participants will contribute to the learning process, which will be participatory and draw on many different techniques, including small group and plenary discussion, short presentations, application of frameworks to participants’ own contexts, role plays and simulations. Space will be created to practice skills essential for cross-cultural communication.

WEEK 3: 2020 | THEMATIC & FIELD-BASED COURSES

Arts Approaches to Community-Based Peacebuilding (AACP)

Babu Ayindo (Kenya) and Kyoko Okumoto (Japan)

Arts Approaches to Community-Based Peacebuilding (AACP)
Babu Ayindo (Kenya) and Kyoko Okumoto (Japan)

This course is grounded on the belief that all humans are artists; therefore, it is designed for any peace worker interested in tapping into his/her own individual creativity in composing works and processes of meaning, beauty and imagination while simultaneously working towards breaking cycles of violence. This is an intensive course that intentionally seeks to critically examine the nature, the theory and practice of arts-based approaches to peacebuilding from a variety of experiences.

Through interactive and experiential learning, the course explores select art forms and how they evolve as cultural processes of conflict resolution, and how the arts intersect with community-based efforts in building peace. These art forms include: storytelling, handiwork, forum theater, visual arts, music and dance. The learning space is intentionally organized to provide a supportive and challenging environment so that by the end of the course, participants will be able to propose and/or strengthen arts-based initiatives relevant to their own contexts.

A special component of the course is a field-visit with pioneer artists in Mindanao working at the intersection of indigenous culture, arts and peacebuilding. 

Community-Based Conflict Transformation: Experiences and Practices of Grassroots Peacebuilding in Mindanao (CBCT) (Field-Based Course)

Pakigdait, Inc. (Philippines) and Kalimudan Sa Ranao Foundation, Inc. (Philippines)

Community-Based Conflict Transformation: Experiences and Practices of Grassroots Peacebuilding in Mindanao (CBCT) (Field-Based Course)
Pakigdait, Inc. (Philippines) and Kalimudan Sa Ranao Foundation, Inc. (Philippines)

This field-based course explores experiences and practices of grassroots peacebuilding in Mindanao. It seeks to distill lessons, emerging strategies, and challenges in addressing violence, transforming conflict, and rebuilding communities from the perspective of grassroots peacebuilders. This course offers a people-to-people interaction with local actors, community leaders, and internally displaced persons that have experienced violence and the destruction of their localities in Marawi City. It is designed so that participants can learn about the steps people have taken to overcome their fear, rebuild their lives and construct more peaceful communities through reflective sharing, storytelling and panel discussions with various key stakeholders from Northwestern Mindanao.

By the end of the course, the participants will understand how communities directly displaced by war and violence harness their inner capacities and become a resource for rebuilding the social fabric of their society. Participants will be able to assess the applicability in their home communities of these initiatives that people in Northwestern Mindanao have taken to create a culture of peace that will serve as a sign of hope and inspiration for the participants as they return to their home communities ready to face their own challenges.

Indigenous Peoples’ Culture-Based Conflict Resolution Practices: Its Potential Contribution to Mainstream Peacebuilding in the Philippines (IPCB) (Field-Based Course)

Joey Ganio Evangelista, MJ (Philippines), Marites T. Gonzalo (Philippines) and Primo Mique Fagel, Jr., MJ (Philippines)

Indigenous Peoples’ Culture-Based Conflict Resolution Practices: Its Potential Contribution to Mainstream Peacebuilding in the Philippines (IPCB) (Field-Based Course)
Joey Ganio Evangelista, MJ (Philippines), Marites T. Gonzalo (Philippines) and Primo Mique Fagel, Jr., MJ (Philippines)

This community field-based course focuses on the culture-based conflict resolution practices of the Tagakolu community in Malita, Mindanao, Philippines. Participants have a glimpse of one of the communities of the Indigenous Peoples of Mindanao, who are collectively referred to as lumad. Through discussions and interactions with Tagakolu elders, leaders and family members, who are the resource persons, and an immersion into the life of the community, participants will gain a greater understanding about practices related to conflict resolution from an indigenous perspective. By the end of this field-based course, participants will have a greater appreciation for, recognize and better understand the indigenous perspective on peace. In addition, participants will have developed their ability to perceive the different dynamics in an indigenous community that are integral to traditional peacebuilding practices and its sustainability.

The class also looks into the efficacy of traditional indigenous approaches to resolving conflict when communities are confronted with coercions from the outside and how it could also be co-opted to benefit only the interests of outsiders. Through interactions between and among participants, indigenous elders, leaders and family members, participants will learn about how culture-based conflict resolution practices are interfaced with legal and judicial procedures of the Philippine government, particularly local government units.

Interreligious Peacebuilding: Approaches for Cooperation, Social Cohesion and Reconciliation (IRPB)

Shamsia Ramadhan (Kenya) and Maria Ida L. Giguiento (Philippines)

Interreligious Peacebuilding: Approaches for Cooperation, Social Cohesion and Reconciliation (IRPB)
Shamsia Ramadhan (Kenya) and Maria Ida L. Giguiento (Philippines)

Religion, in recent years, has gained prominence in the public domain contrary to the thinking that it will become irrelevant. However, its role in many societies has been both constructive and destructive. Religion has been manipulated to perpetrate violence leading to fear and suspicion among people of different faiths. Religion has also been used to promote reconciliation and social cohesion. This course is designed to promote joint action by faith actors, particularly those working in multi-religious contexts, in regions experiencing interreligious hostility and religious motivated violence.

This course explores processes to engage religious actors and institutions to support peace in settings where religion is a key factor in conflict and where religion is already a driving force for communal cooperation. The course further highlights religious teachings on justice and peace from different faith traditions and demonstrates how they can be applied to peacebuilding and conflict transformation. Through case studies, role plays, group discussions and exercises, participants analyze religiously-motivated conflicts, map out religious resources for peacebuilding, and examine challenges and opportunities for interreligious action and cooperation. By the end of the course, participants will have an outline of a plan that will facilitate concrete applications of interreligious peacebuilding in their respective contexts.